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A Talent for Murder

by Andrew Wilson

‘I wouldn’t scream if I were you. Unless you want the whole world to learn about your husband and his mistress.’

Agatha Christie, in London to visit her literary agent, is boarding a train, preoccupied and flustered in the knowledge that her husband Archie is having an affair. She feels a light touch on her back, causing her to lose her balance, then a sense of someone pulling her to safety from the rush of the incoming train. So begins a terrifying sequence of events. Her rescuer is no guardian angel, rather he is a blackmailer of the most insidious, manipulative kind.

‘You, Mrs Christie, are going to commit a murder. But, before then, you are going to disappear.’ But writing about murder is a far cry from committing a crime, and Agatha must use every ounce of her cleverness and resourcefulness to thwart an adversary determined to exploit her genius for murder to kill on his behalf.

The events surrounding Agatha Christie’s disappearance in the winter of 1926 are well-known – that her husband was unfaithful and, after a row, Agatha disappeared on 3rd December and was eventually discovered in a hotel in Harrogate ten days later. But what happened to her in those ten days?

In A Talent for Murder, Andrew Wilson ingeniously take the facts and weaves an utterly compelling and convincing story around this yet-to-be-solved mystery.

About the Author

Andrew Wilson is the highly acclaimed author of biographies of Patricia Highsmith, Sylvia Plath and Alexander McQueen. His first novel, The Lying Tongue, was published in 2007. His journalism has appeared in the Guardian, the Daily Telegraph, the Observer, the Sunday Times, the Daily Mail and the Washington Post.



About Andrew Wilson

Andrew Wilson is the highly acclaimed author of biographies of Patricia Highsmith, Sylvia Plath and Alexander McQueen. His first novel, The Lying Tongue, was published in 2007. His journalism has appeared in the Guardian, the Daily Telegraph, the Observer, the Sunday Times, the Daily Mail and the Washington Post.



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