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Finding Imaginary Friends

Did you have an imaginary friend when you were growing up? Or perhaps your child has an invisible significant other with whom they share their hopes and dreams?

Even if you don’t have any experience with the world of imaginary friends, you’ll still enjoy this great list of children’s titles celebrating these sometimes-elusive pals.

Imaginary Fred by: Eoin Colfer, Oliver Jeffers (Illustrator)
Sometimes, with a little electricity, or luck, or even magic, an imaginary friend might appear when you need one. An imaginary friend like Fred…Fred floated like a feather in the wind until a lonely little boy wished for him and found a friendship like no other. The perfect chemistry between Eoin Colfer’s text and Oliver Jeffer’s artwork make for a dazzlingly original colour gift book.

 

The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friends by: Dan Santat
This magical story begins on an island far away where an imaginary friend is born.
He patiently waits his turn to be chosen by a real child, but when he is overlooked time and again, he sets off on an incredible journey to the bustling city, where he finally meets his perfect match and – at long last – is given his special name: Beekle.

New York Times bestselling and award-winning author and illustrator Dan Santat combines classic storytelling with breathtaking art, creating an unforgettable tale about friendship, imagination, and the courage to find one’s place in the world.

Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak
Originally published in 1963, it has become a much-loved favourite children’s best-seller, and an acknowledged classic of 20th century children’s picture books. Maurice Sendak said: ‘Max, the hero of my book, discharges his anger against his mother, and returns to the real world sleepy, hungry, and at peace with himself… from their earliest years children live on familiar terms with disrupting emotions, fear and anxiety are an intrinsic part of their everyday lives, they continually cope with frustration as best they can. And it is through fantasy that children achieve catharsis. It is the best means they have for taming Wild Thing.’

Charlie and Lola: Slightly Invisible by Lauren Child
Charlie and his friend Marv are in search of strange and tricky creatures. They would like to search without Charlie’s little sister Lola bothering them. But Lola wants to join in.

Luckily, Lola and her invisible friend, Soren Lorensen, know exactly how to catch strange and tricky creatures. All they need is a tea set, a little cart and a rabbit. (And, of course, one or three drops of pink milk.)

This hilariously inventive tale will encourage your little ones to go on their own imaginative, make-believe adventures. (As well as striking a chord with frustrated siblings everywhere!).

Dory Fantasmagory by Abby Hanlon
As the youngest in her family, Dory really wants attention, and more than anything she wants her brother and sister to play with her. But she’s too much of a baby for them, so she’s left to her own devices—including her wild imagination and untiring energy. Her siblings may roll their eyes at her childish games, but Dory has lots of things to do: outsmarting the monsters all over the house, escaping from prison (aka time-out), and exacting revenge on her sister’s favourite doll. And when they really need her, daring Dory will prove her bravery, and finally get exactly what she has been looking for.

With plenty of pictures bursting with charm and character, this hilarious book about an irresistible rascal is a must-read for the chapter book set.

Confessions of an Imaginary Friend bMichelle Cuevas
Jacques Papier thinks that everyone hates him. After all, teachers ignore him when he raises his hand in class, nobody ever picks him for sports teams, and his sister, Fleur, keeps having to remind their parents to set a place for him at the dinner table. But then Jacques discovers an uncomfortable truth: He is not Fleur’s brother; he’s her imaginary friend! And so begins Jacques’ quest for identity …what do you do when you realise that the only reason you exist is because of someone else’s imagination?

The whimsical autobiography of an imaginary friend who doesn’t know he’s imaginary – perfect for fans of Toy StoryThe Imaginary and Moone Boy.


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