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New Chapter Books and YA Releases

If you’re after a new book to keep you child reading this month, then look no further! We have collected a list of new picture books here but if your kid is a little bit (or a lot) older, then here are some new releases that may interest them. Click on the titles or cover images below for more information!

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Author Danny Wallace and illustrator Jamie Littler have a follow up to the riotous Hamish and the Worldstoppers. Once again, Hamish and his friends (the PDF) must save the world from an evil villain, but this time there’s an unnecessarily tall tower, a prime minister who is very excited about his new pants, and kids who look a lot like Hamish and his friends – but with reverse personalities! With its fast pace and absurdist humour, this book is great for readers aged about 8 to 12, and you don’t need to have read the first book to enjoy Hamish and the Neverpeople.

Australian author Anna Ciddor has a new novel, The Family With Two Front Doors. The Rabinovitch family are big and boisterous- there’s eleven of them afterall! Set in 1920s Poland, this book helps introduce readers to another time and place with a loveable cast of characters. Great for ages 8 to 12.

A debut novel for readers 11 and up, Hour of the Bees is sweet and sad. Carol’s grandfather is suffering from dementia but he can still weave incredible stories that help her through the heat, the hurt, and the bees she is pretty sure she isn’t imagining. A tender and moving book.

Next in the New Australian series, a collection of stories from a variety of well-known Australian authors about children and migration, comes Teresa by Deborah Abela of Max Remy and Grimsdon fame. Teresa is a young girl living in Malta during the Second World War who has to flee her home and everything she knows to live in Australia. Inspired by the true story of Abela’s own family, Teresa is about upheaval, survival and courage, and is a good fit for ages 8-12.

And if your child has been loving the Squishy Taylor series as much as we have, then you’ll be needing book #3: Squishy Taylor and the Vase that Wasn’t. Squishy is excellent for younger readers, aged 6 and up.

xthanks-for-the-trouble.jpg.pagespeed.ic.q3j8TqLjX5Lots of great reads for teenagers this month.  We loved Thanks for the Trouble by Tommy Wallach, author of last year’s end-of-the-world bestseller We All Looked Up.  In Thanks for the Trouble, Parker is a fantastic listener – because he doesn’t say a word. After the death of his father five years before, he now only communicates by sign language and writing in his journal (he’s up to journal #124). When he meets Zelda- a silver haired beauty with a real ‘timelessness’ about her, suddenly all he wants to do is be able to say everything he feels out loud. A fantastic YA read for fans of John Green or Rainbow Rowell.

 

Scot Gardner has written many fantastic books for young Australians, including The Devil I KnowWhite Ute Dreaming and Burning Eddy. Now he’s back with The Way We Roll, a ‘rattling urban bromance made of plastic and stainless steel.’ Get ready for a crazy story about truth, trolleys and traction for readers 14 and up. For the same age group, try The Tragic Age by Stephen Metcalfe. Billy Kinsey likes to go through life being different and detached, but he’s about to meet two people that will change it all. Another great coming-of age- story.

For Young Adult fantasy readers try Rebel of the Sands, the first in a new trilogy starring sassy teen gun-slinger Amani Al’Hiza. With Dijinni magic, a gripping love story and page turning action, it’s no surprise this novel has already been making waves all over the world. Also out this month, Australian author Jaclyn Moriarty concludes her thrilling ‘Colours of Madeleine’ series with A Tangle of GoldWill Madeleine and Elliot be able to save the world of Cello? Will they lose each-other forever?  We need answers!

We would love to hear what your child or teen is reading this month, so let us know in the comments.


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