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The Weekly Top 10 Fiction Bestseller List

One of the most exciting things about this week’s Top Ten fiction list is how many favourite bestselling authors are featured. It looks as though thrillers have been dominating everyone’s reading list, and with so many brand new page-turners hot off the press, it’s no wonder why.

At Number 5 is crime master James Patterson’s 16th Seduction, a new instalment in the Women’s Murder Club Thriller series, as well as highly acclaimed standalone The Black Book at Number 2.

For fans of historical fiction, Wilbur Smith retains the Number 1 spot with his latest War Cry, which continues the story of the Courtney family as the Second World War looms closer. . .

It’s been a tradition all year long, and there’s a reason for it: Liane Moriarty has three of her novels in this week’s Top Ten. Big Little Lies is at Number 2, Truly Madly Guilty at Number 4, and The Husband’s Secret at Number 7. We guarantee that all of them are a twisty delight.

Clive Cussler has teamed up with Justin Scott to deliver us The Cutthroat, an Isaac Bell adventure, which tells the story of Chief Inspector Isaac Bell in 1911, who has to solve the case of a murdered actress. This week it takes the Number 8 spot.

And homegrown author Sarah Schmidt has taken bookstores by storm with her debut See What I Have Done, a fictional reinvention of the life of Lizzie Borden, who was famously accused of murdering her mother and step-father in 1892. At Number 10 is All by Myself Alone by Mary Higgins Clark,

Still want more to read? You can also check out the weekly top 10 bestselling non-fiction list and the top 10 bestselling children’s books list on Better Reading.

  1. War Cry by Wilbur Smith (HarperCollins)
  2. Big Little Lies (TV tie-in) by Liane Moriarty (Pan)
  3. The Black Book by James Patterson (Century)
  4. Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty (Pan)
  5. 16th Seduction: A Women’s Murder Club Thriller by James Patterson (Century)
  6. Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty (Pan)
  7. The Husband’s Secret by Liane Moriarty (Pan)
  8. The Cutthroat: Isaac Bell by Clive Cussler and Justin Scott (Penguin)
  9. See What I Have Done by Sarah Schmidt (Hachette)
  10. All by Myself Alone by Mary Higgins Clark (Simon & Schuster)

© Nielsen BookScan 2017 Week Ending 08/4/17 To stay up-to-date with book-related news subscribe here or like our Facebook page.


Comments

  1. Bev. Websterbunnliebev@hotmai

    So excited about the books you print.It helps me so. MucThanks again

  2. Denise Foulds

    Is there a book club associated with this sight

    1. Karen Bartlett

      Click on the link that is referred to above Denise….
      “our first ever live and interactive book club on Wednesday 27th April at 8pm!”

  3. Jessy

    Thanks for the list.

  4. Ginros

    All the light we cannot see is the best book I’ve read in ages!

  5. Tracy Bartlett

    I just wanted to know if Karen was my cousin Karen.

  6. Lissy

    Girl on the train was so overrated. I do not understand the fascination. The Dressmaker was awesome! When is the next book club? We have our own but would love to check out yours. 😃

  7. Margaret

    I found The Dressmaker started off pretty good, then ended very strange….

  8. Gary Moon

    So many great books in this list and some new ones in there for me that I will have to pick up in the coming weeks. Thank you for posting these up.
    The best book I read so far this year has been The Midnight Shrink from Edward Dreyfus (www.dreyfusbooks.net).
    A fantastic psychological thriller/crime fiction from an author with years of experience as a practicing psychologist.
    He brings a lot of themes from his work into the writing and it really adds a level of authenticity that makes his novels that much more enjoyable. A must-read for fans of the genre.

    1. Gaye

      Thanks for this recommendation Gary. I love psychological thrillers, so will definitely read this one!

  9. Lynne

    Love receiving your updates. Would love to hear about more less mainstream authors/new authors. Many of the ones you mention do greet us at the entrance to the bookshop.

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