The Light After the War by Anita Abriel is a Testament to the Power of Humanity

The Light After the War by Anita Abriel is a Testament to the Power of Humanity

Spring 1946

CHAPTER ONE

Vera Frankel had never seen the sun so bright or streets teeming with so many people. Lovers held hands, teenagers zoomed by on Vespas, and old women carried shopping bags laden with fruits and vegetables. Vera smelled sweat and cigarettes and gasoline.

The experience of arriving in Naples from Hungary made Vera remember the early spring days in Budapest when she was eight years old and recovering from diphtheria. The curtains in her room had been drawn back and she was allowed to sit outside and eat a bowl of plain soup. Nothing had ever tasted so good, and the scent of flowers in the garden was more intoxicating than her mother’s perfume.

All around her, people felt the same way now. The outdoor cafés overflowed with customers enjoying an espresso without fear of bombs exploding. They nodded at neighbours they had been too afraid to stop and talk to, and kissed boys returning from the front until their cheeks were raw. Eleven months ago the Allies had defeated the Nazis and the war in Europe was over.

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Reviews

Much of it is True: Anita Abriel Talks About her Novel, The Light After the War

Review | Author Related

17 February 2020

Much of it is True: Anita Abriel Talks About her Novel, The Light After the War

    The Light After the War by Anita Abriel is Completely Wonderful

    Review | Our Review

    17 February 2020

    The Light After the War by Anita Abriel is Completely Wonderful

      Publisher details

      The Light After the War
      Author
      Anita Abriel
      Publisher
      Simon and Schuster
      Released
      01 February, 2020

      Synopsis

      Inspired by the true story of one woman’s extraordinary journey to forge a new life after escaping a train bound for AuschwitzIn 1946 two young Hungarian refugees arrive in Naples after losing everyone they loved before the war. Vera Frankel and her best friend, Edith Ban, are haunted by their terrifying escape from a train headed for Auschwitz after their mothers threw them from the carriage, promising they would follow. But instead the girls find themselves alone in a frozen, alien land. They manage to find refuge and barter for their lives by working on an isolated farm in Austria until the end of the war.Armed with a letter of recommendation from an American general, Vera finds work and new hope at the United States Embassy and, despite her best intentions, falls in love the handsome and enigmatic Captain Anton Wight. But when Anton suddenly disappears, Vera is forced to drastically change course. Their quest to rebuild their lives takes Vera and Edith from Naples to Ellis Island to Venezuela and finally Sydney as they carve out careers – and find love.Heartbreakingly moving and compelling, The Light After the War is inspired by the true story of the author’s Holocaust survivor mother.
      Anita Abriel
      About the author

      Anita Abriel

      Anita Abriel was born in Sydney, Australia. She received a BA in English Literature with a minor in Creative Writing from Bard College, and attended UC Berkeley’s Masters in Creative Writing program. She lives in California with her family and is the author of The Light After the War which was inspired by her mother’s story of survival during WWII.

      Books by Anita Abriel

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      1. virginia james says:

        I enjoyed this book very much. Anita, is Anton Wight your father? Where does the name Abriel come from? I would have liked to see some photos. Thankyou.

      2. Margaret says:

        I really enjoyed reading your book.
        My parents immigrated from Hungary to Australia after the war. I recall some stories told by my mother. They were not Jewish but my mother worked in a house of a Jewish lady. She remembered when the Nazi’s came and took the lady away. She said it was a very sad time.
        Your mention of stuffed cabbage and other dishes took me back in time. The parts you wrote in Hungarian reminded me of when I was young and words my mother said.
        Thank you for the journey and the memories.