Our Picks for the Most Wondercump Dahl Words

Our Picks for the Most Wondercump Dahl Words

oxford-roald-dahl-dictionaryWe think everyone should adopt more Dahl words in their day-to-day conversation. If you’re running late, you better daddle! Maybe someone in the office is being a grump – why not call them a grunion instead? Those few-day-old-leftovers you heated up aren’t looking so good – maybe it’s glubbage

Here are some of our all-time favourite Dahl words and their meanings from The Oxford Roald Dahl Dictionary.

Churgle: When you churgle, you gurgle with laughter.

Daddle: If you daddle, you run very fast.

Fizzwiggler: A fizzwiggler is someone who is mean and cruel

Flussed: If you are flussed, you are worried or anxious

Frotsy: A frosty night or frosty weather is very cold and frosty.

Giganticious Grand and spectacular

Glamourly: Exotic and interesting

Glubbage: Something disgusting that is not fit to eat

Gollop: A big gulp or swallow

Grunion: A very mean or grumpy person

Gungswizzled: If something is gungswizzled, it is in a complete muddle or totally wrong.

Icky- Poo If something tastes icky-poo (as all snozzcumbers do), it tastes REALLY disgusting.

Kiddle: A young child.

Lickswishy: A lickswishy taste or flavour is gloriously delicious.

Mideous: A mideous place is horrible and nasty

Midgy: Something that is midgy is really small and tiny.

Mispise: If you mispsise something, it means you absolutely hate and despise it

Mushious: Something that is mushious is both mushy and delicious

Piggery- jokery: Piggery-Jokery means acting in a silly way and not taking things seriously

Plexicated: If something is plexicated, it is complicated or difficult to do or make

Redunculous: Something redunculous is very silly or ridiculous

Ringbeller: A ringbeller is a really splendid dream, the kind that makes you wake up samiling and happy.

Scrotty: If you feel scrotty, you feel sad and gloomy

Scrumplet: A scrumplet is an affectionate name that you call someone you like

Twizzler: A difficult or unpleasant situation

Wondercump: Wonderful or splendiferous (you could also say phizz-whizzing or whoppsy-whiffling)

Whooshey: A whooshey smell or flavour is very strong, as if the scent had whooshed into your nostrils

 

Here are some sentences we’ve improved using Dahl words, to help you sound more glamourly

– I had a gollop of my lunch and it didn’t taste lickswishy at all, it was practically icky-poo.

– There was a midgy spider in my room- I know I’m being a little redunculous, but it made me feel flussed because I mispise all bugs.

– It was a frotsy morning, but I just woke up from a real ringbeller. What a wondercrump start to the day!

 

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What’s the best Dahl sentence you can come up with? Let us know in the comments!

 Click here to learn more about the Oxford Roald Dahl Dictionary, or here to purchase a phizz-whizzing copy for yourself.

(Image credit: http://bbc.in/1si895p)

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Synopsis

This is not an ordinary dictionary. After all, you wouldn't expect an 'Oxford Roald Dahl Dictionary' to be ordinary, would you?Lots of dictionaries tell you what an 'alligator' is, or how to spell 'balloon' but they won't explain the difference between a 'ringbeller' and a 'trogglehumper', or say why witches need 'gruntles eggs' or suggest a word for the shape of a 'Knid'. This dictionary does all those things. All the words that Roald Dahl invented are here, like 'biffsquiggled' and 'whizzpopping' to remind you what means what, but that is not all. You'll also find out where words came from, rhyming words, synonyms and lots of alternatives for words that are overused.Oxford Children's Dictionaries are perfect for supporting literacy and learning and this is the world's first Roald Dahl Dictionary from the word experts at Oxford University Press. With real citations from Roald Dahl's children's books and illustrations by Quentin Blake, this is authoritative, engaging and accessible and will inspire and encourage young writers and readers.
Roald Dahl
About the author

Roald Dahl

When he was at school Roald Dahl received terrible reports for his writing - with one teacher actually writing in his report, 'I have never met a boy who so persistently writes the exact opposite of what he means. He seems incapable of marshalling his thoughts on paper!'After finishing school Roald Dahl, in search of adventure, travelled to East Africa to work for a company called Shell. In Africa he learnt to speak Swahili, drove from diamond mines to gold mines, and survived a bout of malaria where his temperature reached 105.5 degrees (that's very high!).With the outbreak of the Second World War Roald Dahl joined the RAF. But being nearly two metres tall he found himself squashed into his fighter plane, knees around his ears and head jutting forward. Tragically of the 20 men in his squadron, Roald Dahl was one of only three to survive. Roald wrote about these experiences in his books Boy and Going Solo.Later in the war Roald Dahl was sent to America. It was there that he met famous author C.S. Forester (author of the Captain Hornblower series) who asked the young pilot to write down his war experiences for a story he was writing. Forester was amazed by the result, telling Roald, 'I'm bowled over. Your piece is marvellous. It is the work of a gifted writer. I didn't touch a word of it.' (an opinion which would have been news to Roald's early teachers!). Forester sent Roald Dahl's work straight to the Saturday Evening Post. Roald Dahl's growing success as an author led him to meet many famous people including Walt Disney, Franklin Roosevelt, and the movie star Patricia Neal. Patricia and Roald were married only one year after they met!The couple bought a house in Great Missenden called Gipsy House. It was here that Roald Dahl began to tell his five children made-up bedtime stories and from those that he began to consider writing stories for children.An old wooden shed in the back garden, with a wingbacked armchair, a sleeping bag to keep out the cold, an old suitcase to prop his feet on and always, always six yellow pencils at his hand, was where Roald created the worlds of The BFG, The Witches, James and the Giant Peach, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and many, many more.

Books by Roald Dahl

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