Love Your Leftovers Recipe: Slightly Squashy Tomato & Egg Toast

Love Your Leftovers Recipe: Slightly Squashy Tomato & Egg Toast

This delicious recipe is from the latest River Cottage cookbook, Love Your Leftovers, by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall.
Slighty squashy tomato and egg toastThis deliciously savoury, speedy supper might seem a misfit in this chapter but is so good it had to go in somewhere. Tomatoes should really be stored at room temperature, which keeps them juicy and sweet, but also means that they ripen apace. If you find yourself with a couple of specimens that are heading into squishy territory – just a little too ripe to slice for a salad – this is the way to go. And if you feel greens are a must, serve the egg and tomato atop a layer of wilted spinach on the toast.

SERVES 1

2 large slightly overripe tomatoes

Splash of rapeseed or sunflower oil

1 garlic clove, finely sliced

1 large egg

1 good slice of robust bread

Butter

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

Slice the tomatoes in half around the ‘equator’. Holding the skin side of one half in your hand, grate the tomato flesh on a box grater, into a bowl. Keep going until you have only the skin left in your hand and a nice juicy pile of tomato pulp beneath.

Heat the oil in a small, non-stick frying pan over a medium-low heat and add the garlic. Let it sizzle briefly until just starting to colour.

Add the tomato pulp and some salt and pepper. Increase the heat, bring to a brisk simmer and cook for about 5 minutes, to reduce the liquid down a little.

Meanwhile, break the egg into cup.

Carefully tip the egg gently into the middle of the simmering tomato mixture. Turn the heat down low and cook for 5 minutes or so until the white of the egg is set. You can also baste the egg with the tomato ‘sauce’ to help set the top, or you can flip it, to have it ‘easy over’.

Meanwhile, toast and butter your bread.

Using a large spatula, scoop the egg carefully out of the pan and place it on the toast. Pour the remaining tomato sauce from the pan over the egg. Season again with salt and pepper and tuck in straight away.

Tips and swaps

You can use overripe cherry tomatoes here if you like – about 200g will do. There is no need to grate them. Just cut each one in half and give it a squish to get the juices flowing. Throw them into the hot frying pan when the garlic is nicely coloured.

Spice it up Doctor your tomato sauce with a pinch of spice – either ground cumin or curry powder. A spoon-tip of fiery harissa stirred into the tomatoes is also excellent.

Brunch option Add scraps of ham or cooked bacon or sausage to the sauce, or at the end.

 

Recipes & images taken from River Cottage: Love Your Leftovers by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, published by Bloomsbury.

To purchase a copy of Love Your Leftovers click here

 

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                      Synopsis

                      Love Your Leftovers is for anyone who loves food but abhors waste. And it’s perfect for this festive time of year – we don’t need to feel guilty come Boxing Day when the fridge is groaning with leftovers; all we need is a little inspiration.

                      River Cottage chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall is already well known for his sustainable philosophy around food. Now he breaks it down step-by-step in what will undoubtedly become a classic of household management.

                      Though many of us may already have some thrifty tricks to waste less, especially if we took tips from parents or grandparents who grew up through war or hardship, there’s no doubt that we’ve lost our way when it comes to managing food waste. Most of us will have heard the shocking statistics – it’s estimated that the average Australian household wastes more than $1000 worth or 345 kilograms of food a year!

                      Love Your Leftovers is about exciting recipes to help you make use of all your food, but it’s about general kitchen and household management too – shopping, storing, cooking – that will save precious time and money.

                      Fearnley-Whittingstall encourages us not to think of each meal as a self contained unit, but as more of a chain – ‘ a daisy chain of deliciousness’ he calls it – with one great meal leading to a series of equally tasty other meals.

                       The recipes are about using every part of the food – potato peel, fish skin, bones, wilting greens – with only the bare minimum making it to the compost and much less to the bin. Some have gloriously made-up names, such as Middle Eastern-inspired lamb and chickpea thing-in-a-pan and Rissotover.

                      He advises planning leftovers and even doubling or tripling up when cooking so that every meal can be turned into more meals throughout the week – Sunday’s stew “gains a pastry lid and becomes Tuesday’s pie” or a Bolognese, “with kidney beans and spices, becomes chili con carne.”

                      It’s packed full of handy tips to get you in the habit of effortlessly using leftovers –“Winging it with what’s to hand can be so liberating,” he says. It’s user-friendly and flexible, with lots of recommendations for substitutions so if you don’t have one ingredient you can easily use another, helping you to be even more opportunistic.

                      The book addresses some key issues around using leftovers such as use-by-dates and food safety. It’s well laid out, with each chapter taking us through all those frequently occurring leftovers – FOLs – including bread, fruit, rice, meat, fish, and dairy. And there’s a whole section dedicated entirely to exciting Christmas leftovers.

                      “It’s those seat-of-the-pants, spur-of-the-moment dishes, rustled up from odds and ends loitering in the fridge or cupboards, that often bring me the greatest pleasure,” says Fearnley-Whittingstall. Now the Christmas leftovers can be even more exciting than Christmas dinner itself.

                       

                      Recipes & images taken from River Cottage: Love Your Leftovers by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, published by Bloomsbury.

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