Tiny People and an Enormous Adventure: Read an Extract from The Smidgens by David O’Connell and Seb Burnett

Tiny People and an Enormous Adventure: Read an Extract from The Smidgens by David O’Connell and Seb Burnett

1

Hunter and Prey

‘We’ll never do it!’ moaned Gobkin. He threw his spear down into the quagmire of dirt, hair and congealed fat surrounding his feet, where it landed with a dull splot sound. ‘It’s hopeless.’

Gafferty Sprout counted down from five in her head. She looked at her little brother, his scared face criss- crossed with shadows cast by the grille that covered the extractor pipe in which they were hidden. Warm, greasy light oozed through the metal lattice and dribbled gleaming spots on to the lenses of Gobkin’s goggles. Or was that the glistening of his frightened tears?

Be patient with him, Dad had said to her before the two of them had set out on the expedition. He’s young, but he must learn our ways. Gafferty was learning more about Gobkin’s ways, so far. Annoying little snivel-scrap! He’d moaned and whined all the way through the tunnel. He’d griped and groaned as they scaled the wall to get to the pipe. He’d grumbled and groused as they squeezed through the conveniently sized hole cut in its side. He’d carped and bellyached as they passed the now useless fan that Dad had carefully detached on a previous visit. It was Gobkin’s first time properly out in the Big World and he was acting like it was bath night!

Dad had taken Gafferty out on her first hunt. She’d been brave. The oldest child had to be brave. If something happened to Mum or Dad, then she would be the one in charge. Gobkin was different. He was three years younger than Gafferty, and Mum and Dad had spoilt him, protected him. But that had all changed six months ago, when their little brother, Grub, had been born. A creature of snot and bad temper, he now took up all their parents’ time. Gobkin was no longer the youngest. Gobkin needed to grow up.

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Reviews

A Funny and Magical Adventure: Read our Review of The Smidgens by David O’Connell and Seb Burnett

Review | Our Review

26 April 2021

A Funny and Magical Adventure: Read our Review of The Smidgens by David O’Connell and Seb Burnett

Synopsis

Gafferty Sprout is a Smidgen. A Smidgen looks like a human, sounds like a human, and loves chips with curry sauce like a human – if humans were three inches tall. If you took a human and shrunk it in the washing machine on a very hot spin cycle, you might get something like a Smidgen. Generations ago there were lots of them, living in a maze of tunnels beneath the human village of Dundoodle. But then something happened and they just … disappeared. Now Gafferty, her parents and her little brothers Gobkin and Grub are the only ones left, and the tunnels are forbidden territory. And then Gafferty finds an old map. A map that shows a place deep within the maze where Smidgen tribes can go to meet. Smidgen tribes! Gafferty knows that she has to try to find them. But the tunnels are dangerous. And soon Gafferty discovers she's not the only one looking for the lost tribes, and that three inches of Smidgen hold more power than she ever imagined. The first book in a funny, magical adventures series for 7+ readers who love Terry Pratchett, Max and the Millions and The Borrowers.
Seb Burnett
About the author

Seb Burnett

When he was younger Seb desperately wanted to discover a Lost World, but wasn’t allowed out past tea-time, so spent his evenings making up stories instead. He now lives in Bristol, England, where he runs an Animation company and works as a director, character designer and illustrator. He also wrote and designed the almost famous Bertram Fiddle Adventure Games which are available on iOS, Xbox and Nintendo Switch. He loves creating weird and eccentric characters and is never without pen and paper to scribble down all the peculiar ideas he has.
David O'Connell
About the author

David O'Connell

David O'Connell is a writer and illustrator from South London. He works mostly in children's books (particularly humorous picture books and young fiction), writing for other illustrators or illustrating for other writers! He likes stories about magic and monsters, especially if they're silly monsters, and loves making comics too. His favourite sweets are fizzy cola bottles.

Books by David O'Connell

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